How Do I Clean a Topaz?

“Honey yellow. Fiery orange. Cyclamen pink. Icy blue. In warm or cool tones, topaz is a lustrous and brilliant gem.” – The Gemological Institute of America (GIA)

A Note About Color

Many people think of topaz as an affordable blue gem. You may be surprised to learn that its blue color is hardly ever natural: It is almost always created by treatment. Topaz comes in many more beautiful colors, including honey yellows, fiery oranges and cyclamen pinks and purples that rival the finest sapphires. Topaz with these colors, or precious topaz, is a birthstone for November, while blue topaz is one of the birthstones for December.

The Best Way to Clean

The best way to clean a topaz is with Connoisseurs Dazzle Drops Advanced Jewelry Cleaner, the jewelry cleaner that makes clean solution every time — for cleaner jewelry!

  1. Make your fresh cleansing solution according to the package directions.
  2. Dip your topaz jewelry in the fresh solution using the dipping scoop.
  3. Brush jewelry gently.
  4. Rinse jewelry and dry with a lint-free cloth.

Also try Connoisseurs Sonic Dazzle Stik for professional-level jewelry cleaning, and Connoisseurs Precious Jewelry Cleaner in the classic red jar.

Additional Care Considerations

Topaz earns a score of 8 out of 10 on the Mohs Harness Scale of minerals. Though topaz is quite a hard stone, its structure makes it susceptible to breakage due to sudden changes in temperature and hard contact.

High heat or sudden temperature changes can cause topaz to break. The gem’s color is generally stable to light, but prolonged exposure to heat or sunlight might cause fading in yellow-to-brown, reddish brown, or dark brown topaz.

What Is Imperial Topaz?

Imperial topaz is medium reddish orange to orange-red; it is one of the gem’s most expensive colors. The name originated in Russia, in the 19th century, when the Ural Mountains were topaz’s leading source.

The gemstone mined in the Urals was named to honor the Russian czar. At that time, only members of the royal family were allowed to own this fiery gem.

Source: Gemological Institute of America (GIA)