How to Clean Spinel Jewelry

SpinelRingHow to Clean a Spinel

This year, Jewelers of America and the American Gem Trade Association announced that spinel has been added to the official list of birthstones. Spinel joins peridot as another birthstone option for the month of August. It is only the third time in 104 years that these jewelry trade organizations have added a stone to the birthstone list, “by popular demand.”

Color and Durability

Spinel can range in color from shades of pink and lavender to red and red-orange, to purple, blue and even black. Some spinel stones are extremely rare, depending on their color, but they are found on every continent on Earth.

Spinel makes a good choice for jewelry, not only because of its dazzling array of colors, but also because of its durability. Spinel scores an 8 out of 10 on the Mohs Scale of Mineral Hardness.

Clean with Fresh Solution

The best way to clean a spinel is to use Connoisseurs Dazzle Drops Advanced Jewelry Cleaner, the one that makes fresh cleaning solution every time you clean.

  • Make the fresh cleaning solution by filling the cleansing container with warm water and drop 10 Dazzle Drops in the liquid.
  • Place the jewelry in the cleansing container using the dipping scoop and brush with the specialized cleansing brush.
  • Make sure to get between the prongs and underneath the stone.
  • Use the dipping scoop to rinse your jewelry.
  • Dry with a lint-free cloth.

Additional options for cleaning spinel jewelry include Connoisseurs Sonic Dazzle Stik and Connoisseurs Precious Jewelry Cleaner.  If the stone is set in silver it can be cleaned with Connoisseurs Dazzle Drops Silver Crème.

Spinel Fun Facts

For centuries, spinel was often mistakenly thought to be ruby. It wasn’t until the late 18th century that gemologists developed the technology to differentiate the two gemstones.

  •  The famous “Black Prince’s Ruby,” set in the Imperial State Crown in the British Crown Jewels, is actually a 170-carat spinel.
  • A 398-carat red spinel sits atop the Imperial Crown of Russia, commissioned by Catherine the Great in 1763.
  • The Timur Ruby,” a 361-carat red spinel now owned by Queen Elizabeth, has the names of some of the Mughal emperors who previously owned it engraved on its face.